Students Are Creating Unbelievably Good Short Films on Mental Health

Submit your own short film on mental health through Art With Impact for your chance to win $1,000.

Every month, Art With Impact takes submissions for their OLIVE (The Online Library for Interactive Video and Engagement) Film Collection. It’s an initiative supported, in part, by the National Endowment for the Arts.

The goal? For young filmmakers to create a dialogue around mental health using art and film.

These films were made by college-aged students and have been screened throughout North America. Some of these filmmakers are as young as 19-years-old and their styles run the gamut from stop-motion animation to live action, from experimental to traditional narrative.

Here’s the deal. As someone who has been through the grinder as a film student, trying to get a short a film seen and distributed, I can tell you it’s tough—particularly if your film is dealing with heavier subject matter.

If you’ve always wanted to make a film, or wanted to contribute to the discussion around mental health, or maybe you’ve got a film that would be a perfect fit for this type of showcase, now is your chance to get your work seen.

And you just might be able to win $1,000 for it.

Art With Impact’s Monthly Video Submission Program:
. Art with Impact calls for film submissions each month.
. The submission deadline is the last day of every month.
. Submissions must either be interpretive of mental health, or address it directly.
. Submissions must be 5 minutes or less. Films longer than five (5) minutes will not be considered.
. Each month’s winner is awarded $1,000.
. You can find additional guidelines and submit your films here. 

Help Shape The Conversation Around Mental Health

 

Need help? You can find a crisis centre near you here.

*Opinions expressed are those of the author, and not necessarily those of Student Life Network or their partners.
Chris D’Alessandro

Chris D’Alessandro

Chris D’Alessandro is the Communications Manager at Student Life Network. He puts words together in fancy ways and has more cover-up tattoos than he'd care to admit.